Reach For The Stars Pediatric Therapy Blog

Reach For The Stars with this pediatric therapy and autism services blog by the national early intervention company Achieve Beyond serving CA, CT, FL, MD, NJ, NY and VA continuing to expand. This blog features stories about special needs children, professional therapists and editorials for special needs parents.

10 Signs Your Child Is Ready for Toilet Training

Toilet training is one of the most challenging acts for parents and especially for special needs parents with children on the autistic spectrum. One of the most important aspects is recognizing when the child is actually ready for this training to begin. If the child is not showing the signs of readiness for toilet training, they will not learn successfully. This usually happens in children anywhere between 18-24 months, but can vary depending on the child. Children with special needs may take up to a year longer than others to have the readiness for toilet training. Below are 10 signs that your child is most likely ready for toilet training. All of these criteria do not have to present to start training, but these signs show that the child most likely possesses the independence and understanding of going to the bathroom necessary for success. If you have any toilet training signs you would like to share please comment on this blog posting below. We hope these signs help in your toilet training.

  1. The child knows they are wet and shows that they are uncomfortable in the diaper by either pulling it taking it off or letting the parent know.

  2. The child gets a clean diaper and/or takes the parent into the bathroom.

  3. The child recognizes and responds positively to rewards for positive accomplishments.

  4. The child does not wet / soil throughout the night most of the time.

  5. The child is coordinated enough to walk/run steadily.

  6. The child can pull their pants up and down independently.

  7. The child shows interest in other people’s bathroom habits.

  8. The child has their own words for urine (“pee”) and stool (“poo”).

  9. The child is able to quietly sit in one position up to 5 minutes.

  10. The child is not resistant to learning and using the toilet.

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Monday, 28 September 2020

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