Reach For The Stars Pediatric Therapy Blog

Reach For The Stars with this pediatric therapy and autism services blog by the national early intervention company Achieve Beyond serving CA, CT, FL, MD, NJ, NY and VA continuing to expand. This blog features stories about special needs children, professional therapists and editorials for special needs parents.
Mar
01

Developmental Guidelines: What Most Babies Do at 36 Months

Dervelopemental guidelines for children thirty six months of age (3 years) - Achieve Beyond Blog
Social and EmotionalCopies adults and friendsShows affection for friends without promptingTakes turns in gamesShows concern for crying friendUnderstands the idea of "mine" and "his" or "hers"Shows a wide range of emotionsSeparates easily from mom and dadLanguage/CommunicationFollows instructions with 2 or 3 stepsCan name most familiar thingsUnderstands words like "in", "on", and "under"Says "I", "me", "we", "you" and some plurals (cars, dogs, cats)Talks well enough for strangers to understand most of the timeCognitive (Learning, Thinking, Problem-Solving)Can work toys with buttons, levers and moving partsPlays make-believe with dolls, animals and peopleDoes puzzles with 3 or 4 piecesUnderstands what "two" meansCopies a circle with pencil or crayonTurns book pages one at a timeBuilds towers of more than 6 blocksScrews and unscrews jar lids or turns door handleMovement/Physical DevelopmentClimbs wellRuns easilyPedals a tricycle (3 wheel bike)Walks up and down stairs, one foot on each stepRed Flags For 36 Month Old BabiesDrools or has very unclear...
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6759 Hits
Mar
01

Developmental Guidelines: What Most Babies Do at 48 Months

Developmental guidelines for children forty eight months of age (4 years) - Achieve Beyond Blog
Social and EmotionalEnjoys doing new thingsPlays "Mom" and "Dad"Is more and more creative with make believe playWould rather play with other children than by himselfCooperates with other childrenOften can't tell what's real and what's make-believeTalks about what she likes and what she is interested inLanguage/CommunicationKnows some basic rules of grammar, such as correctly using "he and "she"Sings a song or says a poem from memory like the "Itsy Bitsy Spider" or the "Wheels on the Bus"Tells storiesCan say first and last nameCognitive (Learning, Thinking, Problem-Solving)Names some colors and some numbersUnderstands the idea of countingStarts to understand timeRemembers parts of a storyUnderstands the idea of "same" and "different"Draws a person with 2 to 4 body partsUses scissorsStarts to copy some capital lettersPlays board or card gamesTells you what he thinks is going to happen next in a bookMovement/Physical DevelopmentHops and stands on one foot up to 2 secondsCatches a bounced ball most...
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4379 Hits
Mar
01

10 Summer Activities For Special Needs Children

Summer is here! There are so many great activities that can be done when the weather is sunny and warm outside. Here are some fun activities that can be done with special needs children that can potentially help them improve their social skills, motor skills and cognitive abilities. If you have more fun activities you would like to share with other special needs parents that read this blog please feel free to leave a comment below or post them on Achieve Beyond Pediatric Therapy & Autism Services's Facebook pageDig for worms This a great exercise to improve a special needs child’s fine motor skills. Re-home the worms next to that seedling you planted. The child can have fun getting their hands dirty and at the same time help your garden at the same time. Build a “fairy house” Create a miniature “fairy house” outside with your own yards’ twigs, pebbles, pine...
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10405 Hits
Feb
26

When We Hurt For Our Kids

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It may be impossible not to do, but maybe just being aware of it when we experience it, would be helpful.There may be almost nothing more painful than watching our kids hurt. Most often we'd rather do their suffering for them.I am sure it is "Mama Bear instinct" when we see our kids in any kind of pain - whether it is physical or emotional - whether they are the cause of their pain or not at fault.There are, of course, situations when their pain needs to be our business.And there are plenty more situations where their issues need to belong to our kids.However, the focus of this article is not about whether or not to step in. It is aboutbringing to light the serious ramifications we could create simply with our perspective of the child's issue/s.Sometimes when our kids have pain, we feelsorry for them. …down-right pity them. Learning disabilities,...
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14610 Hits